Guilford Road

Located in the southern portion of Durham, just north of the Guilford town line, the Henry Hubbard House is in an area still actively farmed.

Notable Features

Typical of early nineteenth-century farmhouses, this dwelling displays little in the way of embellished architectural detailing. The two-aver-three bay facade features a modern aluminum doorway with a decorative lintel topped with a simple crown molding cornice. The building'soriginal sash has been replaced with two-over-two windows which exhibit louvered shutters. Additions include a single-story, shed-roofed ell on the rear elevation and a small gable-roofed ell on the north elevation, which features an entrance door and exterior brick chimney. A small, single-story, wooden barn is located to the rear of the house. Facing west onto Guilford Road, this It story, simple Federal period dwelling was erected in 1827. Oriented gable-to-street, the clapboarded post-and-beam frame is supported by a sandstone foundation. Henry Hubbard erected this house in 1827 on land owned by his father, Timothy Hubbard of Guilford. In 1832 the elder Hubbard sold his son the land with dwelling house "to be accounted as part portion of my estate after my decease ll (DLR 17:149). Edward M. Hawley (1811-1859) purchased the property in 1837 and continued to farm the surrounding land. Hawleyls son, Timothy Edwin Hawley, inherited the house in 1861 and sold it to German immigrant Frederick Wimler in 1867. A farmer, Wimler and his wife, Rosine, had one son, Oscar, who acquired the farm upon his father's death. Oscar died unexpectedly from a wagon accident in 1891 and left his wife, Mary Catherine (Lulter , 1856-1943) with five young sons. She married another farmer, Walter E. Blake of Guilford, and the house remained in the Blake family until 1955. Typical of early nineteenth-century vernacular farmhouses, this house derives its significance from its association with the area's early agricultural activity, which continues today.

Historical or Architectural Importance

Facing west onto Guilford Road, this It story, simple Federal period dwelling was erected in 1827. Oriented gable-to-street, the clapboarded post-and-beam frame is supported by a sandstone foundation. Henry Hubbard erected this house in 1827 on land owned by his father, Timothy Hubbard of Guilford. In 1832 the elder Hubbard sold his son the land with dwelling house "to be accounted as part portion of my estate after my decease ll (DLR 17:149). Edward M. Hawley (1811-1859) purchased the property in 1837 and continued to farm the surrounding land. Hawleyls son, Timothy Edwin Hawley, inherited the house in 1861 and sold it to German immigrant Frederick Wimler in 1867. A farmer, Wimler and his wife, Rosine, had one son, Oscar, who acquired the farm upon his father's death. Oscar died unexpectedly from a wagon accident in 1891 and left his wife, Mary Catherine (Lulter , 1856-1943) with five young sons. She married another farmer, Walter E. Blake of Guilford, and the house remained in the Blake family unti 1 1955. Typical of early nineteenth-century vernacular farmhouses, this house derives its significance from its association with the area's early agricultural activity, which continues today.