Guilford Road, east side

Built on a slightly elevated lot the Camp-Motchkiss House is shaded by
large pines. The surrounding rural residential neighborhood consists
of nineteenth and twentieth century dwellings.

  • Record ID: 18
  • Address: Guilford Road, east side
  • Current Owner: Witter, Charles A. & Jane A.
  • Name of Building:
  • Historic Name: Camp-Hotchkiss House
  • Download PDF of Original Record

Notable Features

The threebay, side-hall plan facade features a fully pedimented gable end with a ~ decorative mullioned rectangular window. Fully Greek Revival in style, the facade ~ doorway is flanked by four-paned sidelights and pilasters supporting a simple ~ molded cornice. The most prominent addition to the house is the wrap-around porch capped with a hip roof supported by square posts that rise from an uncoursed rubble and mortar. balustrade. Set in plain trim, six-over-six sash are exhibited throughout. A gable-roofed ell extends from the east elevatioSituated close to the east side of Guilford Road, this 2t story, Greek Revival style house was erected ca. 1850. Resting on a sandstone foundation, the post-and-beam frame is aluminum-sided and capped with an asphalt-shingled gable-to-street roof. In 1846 Curtis C. Camp sold his new dwelling house (see Curtis C. Camp House) on a fiveacre lot between Guilford Road and South End Avenue to his brother, Alexander Camp (1818- w 1903). It was between 1846·and 1850 that Alexander erected this house on the western u z portion of the lot. Camp migrated to Kansas soon after and sold the house to Henry G. ~ Hotchkiss in 1850. Hotchkiss had also purchased from Camp the sawmill located along the ~ nearby brook. Malt Brook during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries boasted such ~ industries as a shingle mill, comb factory, malt house, tanneries, grist mill, fulling ~ mill and cloth mill. In 1857, Hotchkiss died and a year later his newly remarried widow, Matilda Robinson, sold the house to a neighbor, George Atwell. German immigrants Charles H. Kaiser (Keyser) and his wife Mary acquired the house in 1860. The house remained in the Kaiser family until 1885. V> W u a: :::J o V> A fine example of the domestic Greek Revival style, the Camp-Hotchkiss House is notable for its association with the industrial activity along Malt Brook. Durhamn. The first story of the addition is sided with mortar and rubble, similar to the balustrade of the porch.

Historical or Architectural Importance

Situated close to the east side of Guilford Road, this 2t story, Greek Revival style house was erected ca. 1850. Resting on a sandstone foundation, the post-and-beam frame is aluminum-sided and capped with an asphalt-shingled gable-to-street roof. In 1846 Curtis C. Camp sold his new dwelling house (see Curtis C. Camp House) on a fiveacre lot between Guilford Road and South End Avenue to his brother, Alexander Camp (1818- w 1903). It was between 1846·and 1850 that Alexander erected this house on the western u z portion of the lot. Camp migrated to Kansas soon after and sold the house to Henry G. Hotchkiss in 1850. Hotchkiss had also purchased from Camp the sawmill located along the nearby brook. Malt Brook during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries boasted such industries as a shingle mill, comb factory, malt house, tanneries, grist mill, fulling mill and cloth mill. In 1857, Hotchkiss died and a year later his newly remarried widow, Matilda Robinson, sold the house to a neighbor, George Atwell. German immigrants Charles H. Kaiser (Keyser) and his wife Mary acquired the house in 1860. The house remained in the Kaiser family until 1885. A fine example of the domestic Greek Revival style, the Camp-Hotchkiss House is notable for its association with the industrial activity along Malt Brook.